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combatshotgun

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Reply with quote  #1 
I will not deny that this platform became America's rifle but was it a result of modern Marketing fueled by the age old " We don't want you to have it" syndrome?   Did it become so popular because a Major Political party was so insistent on prohibiting it?  Other factors lead to the popularity of this platform and the caliber it primarily came in.

AR-15 stands for Armalite Rifle model 15.  Not sure if it was manufacturers or dealers but Civilian models were being billed as Assault Rifles which of course they are not.  That contributed to the allure.  The caliber of .233 also contributed as the design and caliber meant no recoil of any significance and that is a major allure to many.

Also due to the design we can all agree that the AR is the "Mr. Potato Head" of rifles.   Since many can simply not help themselves when it comes to personalizing everything they own this made the platform very popular.  Most guns you just buy, get ammo and start banging away but with AR the rifle is only the first purchase.   It is followed with hundreds and sometimes thousands (depending on your wealth) of dollars in after market accessories.  Many that have nothing to do with the performance of the weapon.  Many also may even inhibit the performance but they add a look the owner wants portrayed.

Have we been oversaturated with this weapon?  Of course we have.  Is the buzz over?   Will it start buzzing away like a swarm of angry Bee's if the Democrats take back the House?  What happens if another anti-gun Liberal gets in the White House.   Or will it never happened again no matter the anti-gun pressure?  Will all those buyers who after Sandy Hook who paid over $2,000.00 for AR's that cost $700 just a month before realize they fell for the hype and their life was not changed (just their bank accounts) because they had to have an AR, will they walk away from this weapon embarrassed by their own folly?

I know the above has a lot of question but as the title ask, is the AR-15 buzz over for good?

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Number2

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Reply with quote  #2 
JD, you make some great points in your post. I personally do not own an AR-15 because I just don't have a good place to shoot it where I could really enjoy the firearm and the cost of ammo is cost prohibitive for me. I know a lot of people that have them and they certainly have fun with them. Many I see are used by guys in 3 gun and I think this will continue to be the case. As for the people that over paid during the hard to find times, so it goes for that. I do however have a M&P 15-22 that I thoroughly enjoy shooting and I think that it works perfect for me. All the looks and cheap .22 ammo (at least for now), fun for all to enjoy. As always different strokes for different folks. It's what keeps the world moving. People spend money on what they want, sometimes we overpay but as long as we enjoy what we have that is all that really matters.
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entropy

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Reply with quote  #3 
I didn't own one for many years, because I was sick of fixing them in the Army, but I again own one. (I did build one shortly after I got out, but sold it right before the Klinton Ban went into effect.) I got my current one mainly because my son wanted a Savage Axis again, (he'd sold his to buy the AR) and his old 870 back. So we traded. I do believe that every able-bodied man legally able to should own and train with either a 5.56, 7.62x39, or 7.62x51 NATO rifle. The ladies are certainly invited to do so, also. I'm still keeping my AK, I built it for next to nothing. 
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splithoof

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Reply with quote  #4 
Will it stay around?....I think so, simply because enough have been sold. Will it remain as popular? That is harder to call, because the American consumer is so eager to move on to "the latest & the greatest" as defined by the folks in marketing. I think the huge industry built around all the junk to be bolted on will help it, and like the 1911 platform it will continue.
I have always been a fan of .308 battle rifles, and from the early 1980's have used the HK 91, M1A, etc. for those roles. Having seen numerous failures of the AR15 platform during training ( I must admit that those were mostly from built-up Frankenguns), I never had any interest in the AR, and if a .223 weapon was needed, we kept a few Mini-14's in the arsenal that always functioned 100%.
Fast forward to a couple of years ago, when my daughter entered the military (USAF, Security Forces), I felt obligated to purchase a pair of AR's to get her familiar with the platform prior to going to Lackland. What I learned was that things had greatly improved. One of the models was the Ruger SR-556TD with an additional 300 Blackout barrel, and the other was a basic Aero Precision; both have proven to be 100% reliable with good ammunition. I'm glad we did that, the girl graduated with honors in everything during both schools, and can run the AR very well.
That is how the AR platform has worked for us, so I think it will stay. If the legislature doesn't like it, TFB, they aren't getting any of our stuff.
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David Armstrong

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Reply with quote  #5 
I think the buzz stays with us, at least for the near future.  It is still the primary gun for our troops which is always good for sales.  It is also the primary gun for so many competitors, which also keeps fuel to the fire.  As for over-saturation, I just don't see it.  Look at the 1911 market as an example.  Everybody has one, they've been around forever, but they keep selling them as fast as they can make them.
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Unobtanium

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Reply with quote  #6 
No. It remains one of, if not the most versatile rifles, and is always first on the chopping block politically. All things firearm are in the Trump slump right now, though.
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Prisoner6

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Reply with quote  #7 
As remarkable as it may seem, there are still people who do not own ARs and can be motivated to get one by desperation. The weekend after Trump made his convoluted 2A statement a month + ago, I was down at the LGS and business was brisk, with ALL the ARs selling off the wall ... irrespective of brand or price. I heard one fellow asking numerous questions about ARs as he had never owned one, and was worried about not being able to buy one. Last week I was back at the LGS and heard another fellow expressing the same concerns, and he took home a used S&W MP15 as fast as it could be rung up.

I moved away from all things .223/5.56 during the 2013 panic, but I did stumble upon a good deal a few weeks back ... a LEO trade-in Rock River Elite Operator for $600. I took it home for no other reason than it was a nice rifle for a good price.

As many ARs (and uppers, lowers, kits, etc.) as there are in circulation, I'm surprised a satiation point hasn't been reached. The next gun ban panic will be another test for the masses. 
 
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Indigenous Irregular

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm not sure if the AR buzz is over or even over for good.

I will say that any rifle and cartridge used by the U.S. can be assured of relative immortality.  Guys still scramble to buy pristine 1903, Garand, and M14 rifles when they appear.  Archaic calibers like 45-70 Govt live on and I have two rifles in that caliber. 
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Unobtanium

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Reply with quote  #9 
Just a datapoint:

https://www.ammoland.com/2019/04/companies-hit-with-heavy-demand-for-magazines-from-california/#axzz5mwlFb9u4

I'd say the AR is as popular as ever, if not moreso.
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Azrial

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Reply with quote  #10 
I don't believe that there has been any real decline in AR Sales, and if their has, I don't care. I didn't buy mine to be popular, no more than I bought a 3/8" drive ratchet for my tool box, because it is the most popular size.
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Unobtanium

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azrial
I don't believe that there has been any real decline in AR Sales, and if their has, I don't care. I didn't buy mine to be popular, no more than I bought a 3/8" drive ratchet for my tool box, because it is the most popular size.

Agreed. I bought it to fulfill a role and task, and because it is also fun as hell.
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David Armstrong

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Reply with quote  #12 
Not to revive a zombie thread here, but apparently the AR buzz is not over.  One of my friends that owns a gun shop said in the last couple of weeks they have been selling ARs just about as fast as they could put them out on the shelf.  
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FlyBoyTim

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Reply with quote  #13 
With the express purpose of reviving a zombie thread here ๐Ÿ˜ˆ, I think there will always be a market for a single projectile, shoulder fired weapon. That the AR has attracted the ire of many who may serve on a jury of our peers in case we are charged with a crime in relation to a self defense shooting, I think the alternatives, shotguns especially, will become increasingly attractive in the future. Listen to this podcast, itโ€™s long, but educational about this subject:



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David Armstrong

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Reply with quote  #14 
I can certainly support alternatives to the"evil black gun" that gets demonized.  A shotgun is good as long as it is not a tacti-cooled so it doesn't get the same brush.  I've thought something like an old Winchester Trapper in .357 or .44 would be a good one to use if you ever had to go to court just because it is "a cowboy gun like John Wayne used."
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FlyBoyTim

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Reply with quote  #15 
Agreed...
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