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Chainsaw76

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have noticed that most of the rifled shotgun barrel's for sale in 12 Guage tend to be around 20 to 21 inches in length. I have also read that to stabilize a heavy slug one needs a 21 inch length barrel. My question is this why would you need a barrel that long, if maximum velocity is usually reached at 14 inches? Would not the rotation rate be the same out of a 21" barrel trimmed to 14"? Why would the extra seven inches of barrel length be needed?

I am also thinking of loading a cast rifle slug in .45 to .50 caliber in 12 Ga high brass for large hogs or bears at under 200 yds.

Jim
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maloy

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Reply with quote  #2 
A lot of things are going on when a slug is fired.

1. the Sabot does not immediately engage the rifling. Remember Newton's law of motion? Things at rest tend to stay at rest. The sabot takes a moment to engage the rifling fully because it's mass doesn't want to spin and the rifling forces it. So it takes a moment to fully engage the rifling and it's own inertia is overcome.

2. The slug also fights this and briefly slips in the sabot at it starts to spin. At the moment of firing, neither are spinning at the same rate. The slug itself takes longer to get to the same rate. Going from zero to over 1200 FPS in micro seconds, things are going to shift.

This is an overly simplified explanation, but each part of the sequence in the operation from ignition to leaving the muzzle has it own physic that contributes to the whole effect. While it may stabilize sooner, the math supports full stabilization within 18" to 21" if ideal conditions exist.

However, shotgun bores have a wide range of tolerances over rifles and not all sabot ammo will yield the same results from one gun to the next.

Maloy
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FlyBoyTim

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Reply with quote  #3 
Maloy, 
That makes a lot of sense:

A lot of things are going on when a slug is fired. 

1. the Sabot does not immediately engage the rifling. Remember Newton's law of motion? Things at rest tend to stay at rest. The sabot takes a moment to engage the rifling fully because it's mass doesn't want to spin and the rifling forces it. So it takes a moment to fully engage the rifling and it's own inertia is overcome.

2. The slug also fights this and briefly slips in the sabot at it starts to spin. At the moment of firing, neither are spinning at the same rate. The slug itself takes longer to get to the same rate. Going from zero to over 1200 FPS in micro seconds, things are going to shift.

This is an overly simplified explanation, but each part of the sequence in the operation from ignition to leaving the muzzle has it own physic that contributes to the whole effect. While it may stabilize sooner, the math supports full stabilization within 18" to 21" if ideal conditions exist.

However, shotgun bores have a wide range of tolerances over rifles and not all sabot ammo will yield the same results from one gun to the next.”
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maloy

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Reply with quote  #4 
It's one of the reasons I abandoned rifled shotgun barrels. I hated it when I'd find one that worked well and then the manufacturer change something or discontinued them within a couple of years.

The old fashion Foster style slug has been a constant for me with Remington and Federal working fine for when I take the longer shots. In addition, I want to be able to switch ammo at any time.

Surprisingly, I've gotten good results with Sluggers and the Rifled Rem Choke.

Maloy
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FlyBoyTim

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Reply with quote  #5 
It's one of the reasons I abandoned rifled shotgun barrels. I hated it when I'd find one that worked well and then the manufacturer change something or discontinued them within a couple of years.

The old fashion Foster style slug has been a constant for me with Remington and Federal working fine for when I take the longer shots. In addition, I want to be able to switch ammo at any time.

Surprisingly, I've gotten good results with Sluggers and the Rifled Rem Choke.”

I’ve been amazed at the Foster slug accuracy, not to mention the Fiochhi with the wad/tail attached for stability. But I’m not a hunter like Chainsaw, and he’s looking for a 200 yard shooter. This is from my Beretta 1301 Tactical, but at only 25 yards:

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Chainsaw76

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks gents, I appreciate the info!

Jim
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FlyBoyTim

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Reply with quote  #7 
Jim,
I for one would like to see your results at 200 yards on paper. I think you can do it. Good luck... 👍👍👍
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Chainsaw76

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks, I'm going to take a crack at it and see if the results are worth it.

jim
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FlyBoyTim

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Reply with quote  #9 
And if all else fails, there’s always 308 or 45/70 rifles for that job... 🤔
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