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Mark in Alger

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Reply with quote  #1 
I am an armed courier and carry a 9mm duty pistol daily as well as occasionally concealed off duty.

I have a 3 year old Son, and have began putting some thought into how to best secure my pistol at home. So far, keeping it well out of his reach has served the purpose but I understand this won’t work forever. I need a solution that both offers me easy, quick access but keeps it unavailable to young, curious hands.

I’m leaning toward a fingerprint recognition lock box but I’m open to suggestions. This offers the access I need without the need to enter combinations or fumbling with a key in low light conditions. Any thoughts?
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RetDetDave

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yeah Mark, a 3 year old son is going to be an 8 year old son in no time. 8 year olds can reach things you’d never think of. I have a winter place in FL. and only have 2 hand guns there. I ordered one of the fingerprint recognition safes for when I’m gone. It’s large enough for a commander size 1911 plus another Sig 3” 1911.
It works with the recognition via batteries and a regular heavy lock and key in case the batteries die.

It’s much heavier steel than I expected and locks well & pretty air tight too. I didn’t get down there for 10 months last year, both pistols are blued and no rust at all. CLP & a silicone sleeve on both helped too I’d imagine.
The best I can do for you is that I bought it from Brownell’s but can’t remember the brand. Sorry. But it was toward the higher priced ones.

I attached it to a closet shelf with two bolts & recessed locking washers & nuts to the underside. Also into a wall stud all accessed from inside. Being so flat it’s easy to bury under clothes, blankets, boxes etc. & stays well out of sight. It can still be stolen but it’s gonna take a good amount of time & noise. For me it’s done the job. If I can remember the name of it I’ll re-post it here.

Also look on JD’s site. If he carries one it will be good.

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Regards, David F. 
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Mark in Alger

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Reply with quote  #3 
What you’ve done is basically what I’m looking at doing. I shoot a few times a month, carry my pistol almost daily, and clean my pistol often so corrosion in the case shouldn’t be an issue for me. Thanks for the input:)
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Gary8907

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Reply with quote  #4 
Mark,

I'm not a very good wordsmith, so I hope what I put down here makes sense. I don't have any good recommendations as to how to physically keep your weapons out of young hands, but my suggestion is to educate your son's young mind on the do's and do not's of weapons. Don't let your weapon become a mystery to him, as children are drawn to those things that are mysterious and forbidden, and the results of children's adventures into the mysterious can be catastrophic. Teach him that the weapon is a necessary tool that dad uses in his working life, and that it is a dangerous object in the hands of those that are not properly trained to handle it. To that end, train him to be comfortable around weapons and to respect their power. When he gets to the appropriate age teach him the proper way to handle the weapon, disassemble and assemble the weapon, shoot the weapon, clean and maintain the weapon etc. etc. etc. There is no "one way for all" rule, but I firmly believe that education is about as close as we can come to that rule. Good luck, and always let your son know that you love him.
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Mark in Alger

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Reply with quote  #5 
Absolutely agree. Even now, I take him along often when I go to practice with my Brother and/or Father. I was raised the same way and I am already taking him down this same path.

He has nerf dart guns now so he gets to be included in the shooting. We teach him muzzle control and other safety. In a few years we’ll move on to a B.B. gun, then a .22, etc:)
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David Armstrong

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Reply with quote  #6 
I use a small safe with a combination lock.  We've tried the fingerprint thing in the past with varied success.  Given we often have rather dirty hands around here we decided the combination was better for us.  Someone who isn't working on cars or playing farmer a lot like we do might not have that same problem.  Most guns go in the main safe, the regular carry handguns go in the small safe when they are not in use.
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Mark in Alger

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Reply with quote  #7 
That was a concern of mine, but so far it’s functioning flawlessly. This model also can be opened with a 6 button combination or keys in case the battery dies. Love it so far:)
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