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combatshotgun

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have asked many people this question who have Consealed Pistol License or were when we were talking about defense guns.   The number one answer overwhelmingly was " I haven't".  

As a Team Leader of an HRT I wanted every other range session to be at night, however that was impossible because EPA would not approve us for a range so I had to rent time from other Agencies and beg for time for those who did not charge.   So, if we got every 4th session at night we were lucky.

Everything changes at night.   If you haven't been involved in night fire training  it will be hard for me to describe it to you.   I guess it is best described as this.   You can see a little bit when you draw and fire and after you fire you can't see shit.    That is about the best description I can give.

When I train at night I have developed the habit of closing my left eye just as a I fire and then immediately opening it after I double tap.   This preserves half of my night vision and helps me find the target to fire my next shots.

I know some of you are thinking that it is stupid to fire that second round blind.   Thing is I double tap all the time and the second shot is always very close to the first even though I was not sighting.   Train that way in day light and it will help you at night.  Try it for the first time at night and your second round may be at the moon.   I am also an instinctive shooter and don't use sights at short ranges so my style of shooting is effective as long as I have acquired the target.

Training at night is mainly for close up and personal defense.   If it is very dark and if a threat is at distance I can slip away to cover or out of the area.    So shooting from 3 to 15 yards is where you want to perfect the skill.

Some of you may have other tricks or methods to share about night fire so please jump in.   If you are reading this and have never fired at night then think about this.   It is dark for half your life and when will most defense scenarios happen?  Yep, night time.  Yet I wager that over 90% of us never train at night.


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D.J. north woods

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Reply with quote  #2 
Our club range shuts down at sunset. 
Being from Michigan, you may be aware of the new DNR range
we MAY get. Hope that puppy will be open late.
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splithoof

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Reply with quote  #3 
At our private club in the high desert, we regularly have practice sessions and "events" that in the summertime that often extend to nearly daylight hours. Yes, it can be tiring on the drive home, but the experience is well worth the work, and lots of fun. Going through a shoothouse after dark is vastly different than in daylight, and is a great way to get your lighting tools/weapons sorted out.
Rifle range drills where the targets can be intermittently illuminated by proctors using shot timers and other controls are useful for creating time-pressure variables, adding a whole new challenge.
Shooting from moving vehicles in different low/no light scenarios adds another element.
Be safe, learn, have a good time.
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combatshotgun

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Reply with quote  #4 
Dang it Splithoof sounds like you are in Gun Powder Disney Land Heaven.   What a great way to spend an evening.   Sure would like to do all that one night.   Would probley be the most fun I had with my pants on in many years.
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splithoof

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Reply with quote  #5 
It is indeed lots of fun, but offers valuable learning as well.
One of my favorite long guns to use at night is an 870MM, fitted with the SureFire forearm. That is the shotgun that I brought along for Gunsite's 260 & SATP, and we ran a night segment in that class where the attached light worked very well. I also use the Choate full stock w/grip, to aid in reloading, manipulating doors, etc. Tritium night sights, sidesaddle, Wilson safety, and sling make it a viable tool for night use. That scattergun is always in the rack at all our night events, I have used it numerous times for introducing transition skills, another good skill to practice day and night.
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splithoof

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Reply with quote  #6 
One of the tools of the discussion:

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Topwaterpro

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Reply with quote  #7 
How true it is that you can't see a damn thing after close range shooting. We have a local indoor (Private) range. We shoot on Wednesday nights and I've learned a lot about being blinded. my 44mag lights up the whole building and the scatter guns turn it into day time.  I've found it to be true at long range also. My father and I used to take long range shots at night. predator hunting, Just for fun we would take clay pigeons and paint them with glow paint set them out at various yardage and with just ambient lighting see who was the better shot. looking down the barrel of our 300 and 7mm's the muzzle flash would blind you for a moment. The close one I trick works well for such occasions. I have learned over the years to shoot ambidextrously which can also be a plus in night time situations.   I do a lot of Coon hunting and have found that with weapon lights the flash isn't as bad. I aim for the spot between the two green dots staring at me and turn them out.  
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David Armstrong

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Reply with quote  #8 
Sadly I don't get to shoot much at all these days due to health problems.  But when I was active I made it a point to do a low-light shoot at least once a month because it is such a different experience than a daylight event.  I also liked to mix it up when I could, sometimes using the emergency lights, or activating a strobe, or ambient lighting with car headlights at various angles to the target, etc.
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entropy

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Reply with quote  #9 
Last summer coyote hunting. 
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Rangenazi

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Reply with quote  #10 
When I was still working, low light shooting was at least once a month. After I retired it's at least 3 times per year. 

If muzzle flash is a big problem you can try different brands of ammo. Some companies add flash retardants to there powders expressly for that reason. If memory serves Hornady and Speer have lower muzzle flash.
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